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Table of Contents:

   Deadline Reminder: "Banner-Strike" contest                                      
     - G a r r e t t - <garrett.lynch {AT} eudoramail.com>                                

    Technology and culture Topia special issue                                     
     "Jody Berland" <jody.berland {AT} sympatico.ca>                                      

   CFP: Topia issue on Technology and Culture                                      
     Ned Rossiter <Ned.Rossiter {AT} arts.monash.edu.au>                                  

    CFP - Perforations 26: Kismet, my love...                                      
     Charles Kriel <journal {AT} kriel.tv>                                                

   Winter Streams feature II                                                       
     "MediaCentre" <agricola-w {AT} netcologne.de>                                        

   CALL FOR ENTRIES: KULTURVERMITTLUNG MIT DIGITALEN MEDIEN                        
     "netzspannung.org redaktion" <redaktion {AT} netzspannung.org>                       

   cfp: CULTURAL ATTITUDES TOWARDS TECHNOLOGY AND  COMMUNICATION                   
     Ned Rossiter <Ned.Rossiter {AT} arts.monash.edu.au>                                  

   cfp: E-Governance: Regions, Devolution, Participation, Formation                
     Ned Rossiter <Ned.Rossiter {AT} arts.monash.edu.au>                                  



------------------------------

Date: Tue, 8 Apr 2003 15:22:16 -0400
From: - G a r r e t t - <garrett.lynch {AT} eudoramail.com>
Subject: Deadline Reminder: "Banner-Strike" contest

+-----------------------------------------------------------+

Hello everyone

Just reminding everyone that the deadline is coming up for the
Banner-Strike Contest, a joint project of the Banner Art Collective
(http://bannerart.org/) and Velvet-Strike
(http://www.opensorcery.net/velvet-strike/).

Banner-Strike is a contest for digital graffiti and net.art that is
created under specific limitations and which critically examines the
war in Iraq.  All entries will be displayed in bannerart.org's ongoing
banner art exhibition and also turned into a Velvet-Strike spray (to be
installed in Counter-Strike).  The winner of the contest will win the
October 2003 release of Counter-Strike: Condition Zero and will be
highlighted on the front page of both sites for one month.

The deadline for submissions is 16 April, 2003.  The winner will be
announced on 18 April, 2003.

- - Technical Requirements -

Submitted banners need to be in gif or jpeg/jpg format with no animation.
All of the following sizes are acceptable: 234x60, 88x31, 120x60, 120x240,
125x125, 240x400, 300x250, 336x280 and 250x250. To submit, go to
bannerart.org and use the submission form upload your work for review.
Please mark in the "special requirements" field on the upload form that
your submission is for the contest and not just for normal entry to the
site's continuing banner art exhibition, submissions for which are
continuing as usual.

All entries will be shrunk proportionally and converted to a spray paint
.wad file by the creators of Velvet-Strike. You can do this conversion
yourself to test how your work might look, by downloading the freeware
application "Wally 1.55b" on the "Counterspray" site
(http://www.counterspray.com/makeyourown.htm). Below is the list of
conversion sizes that will be used:

234x60 half-banner->192x48
88x31 microbar->96x32 (with a transparent border)
120x60 button->96x48
120x240 button->64x128
125x125 button->96x96
240x400 rect->48x80
300x250 rect->96x80
336x280 rect->96x80
250x250 popup->96x96

Any technical questions should be directed to Brandon Barr
(brandon {AT} bannerart.org), Garrett Lynch (garrett {AT} almost.be), or Anne-Marie
Schleiner (opensorcery {AT} opensorcery.net).

+-----------------------------------------------------------+

a+
Garrett Lynch / Brandon Barr

- --
+-----------------------------------------------------------+


------------------------------

Date: Wed, 9 Apr 2003 11:59:57 -0400
From: "Jody Berland" <jody.berland {AT} sympatico.ca>
Subject:  Technology and culture Topia special issue

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

- ------=_NextPart_000_0037_01C2FE8F.8A82C6C0
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable




CALL FOR PAPERS

      Special Issue of TOPIA: Canadian Journal of Cultural Studies
Technology and Culture

The age of technoculture has intensified in the passage from cybernetics =
to cyberculture, from WWII systems research to the automated smart =
environments of today. Whether or not information is simply the pursuit =
of war by other means poses vital questions in our post-Cold War, =
megamachinic universe. Names for this passage pile up: infoculture, =
surveillance society, age of intelligent machines, network society, and =
the rest. Reality is thought to be inextricably bound up with =
technology, so that the terms of the real are defined by degrees of =
intersection, entanglement, and indistinction between bio-and =
techno-ecologies. Culture in this globalized, logofied, wired world is =
perfused with a delirious cyberbuzz; critical examination of its terms =
and conditions must compete, even in the university, with "real" =
products and applications whose powers are continuously reinforced by =
the dominant discourses and practices of neoliberalism and commercial =
culture. Speed, automation, convenience, mutation, contamination, =
incorporation: these are major attributes of the world in which we are =
being embedded. These attributes call for critical interdisciplinary =
historical and reflexive research. There is a rich Canadian legacy in =
thinking in and about technoculture, and we wish to extend it in this =
special issue. We also seek work that puts these positions into dialogue =
with contemporary perspectives now emerging within the international =
field of cultural studies.=20

Potential Topics:

Canada Hacks: Technological Counterpublics and Digital Public Spheres

The New Non-Cuisine: Foodceuticals and Frankenfoods

Technologies as Spatial Practice: Architectures of Smartness, =
Non-Places, and Urban Space

The Everyday (In)Security Infoverse After 9-11

Discursive Practices of "Technology Transfer"

Articulations of Art and Technoscience

Neoliberalism and the Rise of Embedded Internet/ICT Research

Corporeality and Prosthetic Culture

The 'Real-Time' Bias of Culture

Technology, Cultural Politics, and/or Social Movements

Materialities of New Communication Technologies/Technocultural =
Materialist Approaches

Green Perspectives on the New Media Environment

Issue Editors:

Jody Berland

Gary Genosko

Bob Hanke

Topia {AT} yorku.ca

Deadlines:

Draft papers (or title, abstract and brief bio) must be received by May =
30, 2003. We welcome review essays, offerings, visual essays, and =
articles, and (if funding permits) thematically related contributions to =
our website. Special project funding is being sought for this project. =
For submission guidelines to Topia see Guide for Contributors at=20

Please send manuscripts to Topia: Canadian Journal of Cultural Studies, =
Graduate Program in Communication and Culture, 303 Calumet College, 4700 =
Keele St, York University, Toronto M3J 1P3. Deadline for final version =
of accepted manuscripts is December 31, 2003. The theme issue will be =
published in Topia 11, Spring 2004.=20




Editor, TOPIA: Canadian Journal of Cultural Studies
www.yorku.ca/topia=20
Help us reach our goal of 500 subscribers=20


- ------=_NextPart_000_0037_01C2FE8F.8A82C6C0


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 11 Apr 2003 13:28:37 +1000
From: Ned Rossiter <Ned.Rossiter {AT} arts.monash.edu.au>
Subject: CFP: Topia issue on Technology and Culture

Date: Thu, 10 Apr 2003 12:39:13 -0400
From: Jody Berland <jody.berland {AT} sympatico.ca>
Subject: CFP (fixed)



CALL FOR PAPERS


Special Issue of TOPIA: Canadian Journal of Cultural Studies

TECHNOLOGY AND CULTURE

The age of technoculture has intensified in the passage from
cybernetics to cyberculture, from WWII systems research to the
automated smart environments of today. Whether or not information is
simply the pursuit of war by other means poses vital questions in our
post-Cold War, megamachinic universe. Names for this passage pile up:
infoculture, surveillance society, age of intelligent machines,
network society, and the rest. Reality is thought to be inextricably
bound up with technology, so that the terms of the real are defined
by degrees of intersection, entanglement, and indistinction between
bio-and techno-ecologies. Culture in this globalized, logofied, wired
world is perfused with a delirious cyberbuzz; critical examination of
its terms and conditions must compete, even in the university, with
"real" products and applications whose powers are continuously
reinforced by neoliberal hegemony and commercial culture. Speed,
automation, convenience, mutation, contamination, incorporation:
these are major attributes of the world in which we are being
embedded. These attributes call for critical interdisciplinary
historical and reflexive research. There is a rich Canadian legacy in
thinking in and about technoculture, and we wish to extend it in this
special issue. We also seek work that puts these positions into
dialogue with contemporary perspectives now emerging within the
international field of cultural studies.

Potential Topics:

Canada Hacks: Technological Counterpublics and Digital Public Spheres

The New Non-Cuisine: Foodceuticals and Frankenfoods

Technologies as Spatial Practice: Architectures of Smartness,
Non-Places, and Urban Space

The Everyday (In)Security Infoverse After 9-11

Discursive Practices of "Technology Transfer"

Articulations of Art and Technoscience

Neoliberalism and the Rise of Embedded Internet/ICT Research

Corporeality and Prosthetic Culture

The ‘‘Real-Time’’ Bias of Culture

Technology, Cultural Politics, and/or Social Movements

Materialities of New Communication Technologies/Technocultural
Materialist Approaches

Green Perspectives on the New Media Environment



Issue Editors:

Jody Berland, Gary Genosko, and Bob Hanke

<mailto:Topia {AT} yorku.ca>Topia {AT} yorku.ca



Deadlines:

Draft papers (or title, abstract and brief bio) must be received by
May 30, 2003 to facilitate fundraising for the issue. We welcome
review essays, offerings, visual essays, and articles, and (if
funding permits) thematically related contributions to our website.
Special project funding is being sought for this project. For
submission guidelines see Guide for Contributors on the Topia website.

Please send manuscripts to:

Topia: Canadian Journal of Cultural Studies, Graduate Program in
Communication and Culture, 303 Calumet College, 4700 Keele St, York
University, Toronto M3J 1P3.

Deadline for final version of accepted manuscripts is December 31,
2003. The theme issue will be published in Topia 11, Spring 2004.


Editor, TOPIA: Canadian Journal of Cultural Studies
<http://www.yorku.ca/topia>www.yorku.ca/topia
Help us reach our goal of 500 subscribers


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 11 Apr 2003 15:01:00 +0100
From: Charles Kriel <journal {AT} kriel.tv>
Subject:  CFP - Perforations 26: Kismet, my love...

Apologies for any cross-postings. Please forward as you think appropriate.

Call for papers:

Kismet, my loveŠ
Perforations 26

Guest editor ­ Charles Kriel <journal {AT} kriel.tv>
Senior editor ­ Robert Cheatham <zeug {AT} pd.org>
http://www.perforate.org/

Theme:
Kismet, my loveŠ is concerned with the growing phenomena of the mediation of
personality and the marketing of the self via new tools for communication:
text and multimedia messaging; 3G video phones; mobile and stationary email;
web pages; web logs; networked software agents and others. It is concerned
with both the technical workings of any new innovations with potential use
in this context, as well as the social implications and the theoretical
issues surrounding them. As Perforations is an e-journal with impact beyond
the theoretical, we are interested in works that express their ideas through
a variety of media, including sound, video, visual art, performance, etc.,
as well as the written paper.

George Myerson¹s Heidegger, Habermas and the Mobile Phone, is a one possible
starting point in this exploration. To quote John Bird on Myerson: [M]obile
phone communication is, essentially, the provision of information through a
technology which does not really require a person on the other end of the
handset.

The MIT AI Lab robot, Kismet, built by Dr. Cynthia Breazeal, is another
source. Although Kismet speaks nonsense, it will engage you in conversation.
Through gesture and vocal inflection, it will make clear that it understands
that you have said something to it, it will speak non-demanding nonsense
back to you, and then indicate that it is your turn to speak again. It
insists only that you keep it at the right level of stimulation, and that
you keep a reasonable distance.
Finally, blogs play a role in this work. Certain Frankfurt School theorists
critiqued the wearing of one¹s personality externally and materially,
whether through fashion or some other inscription into the corps of
collective expression; the more democratic the language of expression, the
more banal. Blogs, which typically express individual personality via a
collection of links and a display of friendships (I am what I reference),
are ripe for evaluation within this framework, whether pro-Adorno, anti-, or
viewed within more contemporary theoretical parameters.

This particular trend of expression of the individual via selection from the
collective belies a drift in culture in general: the arrogation of the
curator over the artist, the DJ over the musician, the blogger over the
journalist. Kismet, my loveŠ privileges neither voice, but seeks to evaluate
this shift in culture.

Format:
There are no limits to media formats, other than that which can (reasonably)
be placed on the web. There are preferences, however: PDF & Word files will
be converted into HTML and be made available for download in either format.
Papers and artworks are equally encouraged.

Submissions:
Submissions should be sent to Charles Kriel, at journal {AT} kriel.tv

Deadline: 31 August 2003
Abstracts: 31 May 2003
Perforations is an affiliate of Public Domain, Inc, a 501-c-3 organization
unaffiliated with any other organization.




Charles Kriel
Guest editor

Charles has been creating film/video and media works since relocating from
Atlanta ten years ago; first to Prague, then Venice and London. Born a
third-generation circus performer, Charles is a viva away from PhD in media
art from Central Saint Martins, and has received awards/grants/commissions
from Prix Ars Electronica, ICA, MOMA-Oxford, London Institute, Royal
Festival Hall, British Council, Dance on Screen, and London Arts. As a media
artist, he has exhibited in the gallery of Tomato Design, at the 1999 Venice
Biennale, and throughout the Middle East, Europe, Russia, the US and
Australasia. As a composer, he has composed by commission an opera and
several song cycles, and his work is released by ÖRF (Austria) and
Electroshock (Moscow). As a filmmaker, writer and photographer, he is
regularly commissioned by BBC Radio 1 and BBC 1Xtra and has also been
commissioned by MTV, ITV and Channel 4.

Also a media theorist synthesising the works of McLuhan, Lacan and Freud as
they apply to digital media in his recent work Noise and the Uncanny, he has
delivered papers and talks at University of Westminster, Institute of
Education, London Institute, Oxford Brookes, and a slew of conferences.

Charles (VJ Kriel) is also a VJ, and has been called ³the world¹s leading
VJ² by the NME, and is resident VJ for BBC Radio 1, BBC 1Xtra and Pete
Tong¹s Essential Selection. He has been cited by The Times as ³club
culture's first superstar VJ,² and regularly performs in Ibiza, Ayia Napa,
and across Europe and SE Asia. Since Spring 2000, he has performed for
nearly 1.5 million clubbers internationally.

 


------------------------------

Date: Wed, 9 Apr 2003 09:43:37 +0200
From: "MediaCentre" <agricola-w {AT} netcologne.de>
Subject: Winter Streams feature II

Cinematheque at MediaCentre
Le Musee di-visioniste
http://www.le-musee-divisioniste.org/mediacentre/

is currently showcasing "WINTER STREAMS",
streaming video works.

This is the second feature within a series
focussing on indiviual artists presented in this show.
This time are featured >>>>>>>
>>
Michael Alstad (Canada)
Jody Zellen (USA)
Alvin Soon (Singapore)

all works can be accessed via
Cinematheque site
http://www.le-musee-divisioniste.org/mediacentre/
********************************
Artist:
 *name Michael Alstad (Canada)
*work:
 *title 15 SECOND BLOW JOB
 *year 2002
 *about the work:
Andy Warhol created the seminal film Blow Job in 1964, the year I was born.
He extended the duration of his early silent works by having them projected
at a slower rate than what it was originally shot at (16 frames per second
instead of 24). 15 SECOND BLOW JOB was originally launched at the Transmedia
2002 festival in Toronto where each artist had a 15 second time limit for
their works to be screened on a public video billboard. Commenting on the
ephemeral nature of media and celebrity culture, I had to speed things up a
bit - the 35 minute Blow Job was condensed into 15 seconds - the duration of
a standard video billboard ad slot.

 *about the artist:
MICHAEL ALSTAD is a Toronto based artist, curator and graphic designer.
Michael is a founding member of YEAR ZERO ONE, a net.art gallery and
electronic art forum, and the Symbiosis Collective, a group of
multidisciplinary artists whose 4 site specific occupations took place in
vacant buildings in Toronto from 1992 - 1997. His work has been featured in
exhibitions and festivals in Toronto, New York, London, Berlin and Graz,
Austria. Michael is dedicated to autonomous methods of direct
artist/audience communication via electronic networks, site-specific
installations and public art interventions.
**************************************

Artist:
*name: Jody Zellen (USA)
work:
*title: Buildings
*year 2002
*about the work:
"My work draws from media sources. I use images from historical archives as
well as from the newspaper to explore the relationship between the recorded,
the observed, and the imagined city."

*about the artist:
Jody Zellen is an artist living in Santa Monica, California. She works in
many media simultaneously making photographs, installations, net art, public
art, as well as artists' books that explore the subject of the urban
environment.

***************************************

Artist:
*Alvin Soon (Singapore)

*work
*title: Virtual Identity
*year: 2002
*about the work:
Contemporary social theory points to the modern identity as fragmented and
being in a permanent state of flux, with different parts coming together to
form a whole. Likewise in everyday life, we are all familiar with our
multiple identities as father, son, husband, worker, friend, etc. This
notion of human identity as a multiple, simultaneous occurring phenomena
forms the basis of this video short.

In it, the protaganist awakes from his slumber to peel off his different
faces, taking out several masks that depict his multiple identities. This is
not only a throwback to the Latin concept of masks as identities but also to
the uniquely Chinese idea of faces as the basis of man's identity.

Later scenes show the protaganist holding his different faces/identities
with numerous hands, outlining the concept of modern man's simultaneous
multiple identities as well as posing the question of man's own divinity by
depicting a deity-like image. The question is answered by the fact that
modern man is able to achieve a virtual god-like status of having
simultaneous multiple identities only through the use of technology, which
the video tries to depict by using black and white images.

The final scene shows the protaganist going back to his slumber, lapsing
back into human form, summing up the notion that one needs to "wake up" in
order to see the reality of modern man's multiple identities.

*about the artist:
Alvin is 27-year-old who resides and works in Singapore. A self-taught video
artist, he is currently pursuing a course in multimedia art in an art
college.

.
all works can be accessed via
Cinematheque site
http://www.le-musee-divisioniste.org/mediacentre/

*******************************
Cinematheque at MediaCentre
Le Musee di-visioniste
http://www.le-musee-divisioniste.org/mediacentre/
contacts:
mediacentre {AT} le-musee-divisioniste.org

Cinematheque is designed and optimized for
DSL Internet connection
fast computer Pentium III 800 Mhz or better
or comparable MAC
VGA resolution 1024x768
following players/plug-ins are required
Flash6, Quicktime, Real, Shockwave
*******************************







------------------------------

Date: Thu, 10 Apr 2003 12:14:25 +0200
From: "netzspannung.org redaktion" <redaktion {AT} netzspannung.org>
Subject: CALL FOR ENTRIES: KULTURVERMITTLUNG MIT DIGITALEN MEDIEN

 [ English version below ]

============================================================
 CALL FOR ENTRIES: KULTURVERMITTLUNG MIT DIGITALEN MEDIEN
============================================================

Digitale Medien ermöglichen die virtuelle Rekonstruktion
längst verschwundener Bauten, die Gestaltung und Erkundung
digitaler Wissensräume durch innovative Interfaces, die
Integration entfernter oder digitaler Räume in Museen und
Ausstellungen und die Entwicklung neuer spielerischer,
interaktiver und kommunikativer Vermittlungsstrategien.


Diese unterschiedlichen Ansätze sollen auf der Internet-
plattform für digitale Kunst und Kultur, netzspannung.org,
exemplarisch dargestellt werden.


Ziel ist es einen Überblick über die verschiedenen
Strategien zu bieten: von rein digitalen Räumen (Internet,
VR, CD-ROM, DVD) über AR- und Mixed-Reality-Szenarien bis
hin zu medialen Konzepten, die sich dem physischen Raum
einschreiben/unterordnen.


Dieser Überblick soll vermitteln
  > wie digitale Medien zur Vermittlung des kulturellen
    Erbes eingesetzt werden,
  > welche neuen Möglichkeiten mit digitalen Medien
    entwickelt werden, um kulturelle Artefakte medial zu
    vermitteln, 
  > wie digitale Technologien und kuratorische Arbeit
    ineinander greifen.


netzspannung.org ist ein Online-Archiv für digitale Kunst
und Kultur und präsentiert aktuelle Projekte aus
Medienkunst, Mediengestaltung und IT-Forschung
[weitere Informationen: http://netzspannung.org/about]


Dieser “Call for Entries³ soll gewährleisten, dass ein
möglichst vielfältiges Bild entsteht und Projekte, die
gerade erst entstehen, berücksichtigt werden.

Reichen Sie Ihr Projekt oder Vorschläge für Artikel zum
Thema ein: redaktion {AT} netzspanung.org

Oder veröffentlichen Sie Ihr Projekt direkt auf der
Internetplattform unter:
http://netzspannung.org/netzkollektor

============================================================
Einreichungen bis 31. Mai 2003
============================================================

Keywords:
- ---------
Cultural Heritage, Mixed Reality, Virtual Reality,
Wissensräume, Online-Ausstellung, Digital Heritage,
Multimedia-Archiv, Telepräsenz, intuitive Interfaces,
Kulturvermittlung.


netzspannung.org wird am MARS - Exploratory Media Lab des
Fraunhofer Instituts für Medienkommunikation unter der
Leitung von Monika Fleischmann und Wolfgang Strauss
entwickelt und vom Bundesministerium für Bildung und
Forschung (BMBF) gefördert.

Ansprechpartner:
    Gabriele Blome und Jochen Denzinger
    redaktion {AT} netzspannung.org

http://netzspannung.org/cultural-heritage
http://netzspannung.org
http://www.imk.fraunhofer.de/mars




============================================================
 CALL FOR ENTRIES ­ COMMUNICATING CULTURE WITH DIGITAL
 MEDIA
============================================================

Digital media make it possible to use virtual technology to
reconstruct buildings that have long since disappeared,
design and explore digital knowledge spaces using
innovative interfaces, integrate remote or digital rooms in
museums and exhibitions and develop new play-based,
interactive communication strategies.


netzspannung.org, the Internet platform for digital art and
culture, is planning to show examples of these different
approaches. The aim is to provide an overview of the
different strategies, from purely digital spaces (Internet,
 VR, CD-ROM, DVD) through to AR and mixed-reality scenarios
and media concepts that are based in or take a subordinate
role to physical space.


This overview should show:
  > how digital media are used to communicate cultural
    heritage 
  > what new possibilities are being developed with digital
    media in order to present cultural artefacts in a
    media-based way
  > how digital technologies complement the work of the
    curator.


netzspannung.org is an online archive for digital art and
culture that presents current media-art, media-design and
IT-research projects. [For further information see
http://netzspannung.org/about/en]


This "Call for Entries" should ensure that the picture that
emerges is as wide-ranging as possible and that project
that are only just in the process of being created are
also included.


Send your project or suggestions for articles on the
subject to: redaktion {AT} netzspanung.org
or publish your project directly on the Internet platform
at: http://netzspannung.org/netzkollektor/en

============================================================
Entries by May 31, 2003
============================================================

Keywords:
- ---------
cultural heritage, mixed reality, virtual reality,
knowledge spaces, online exhibition, digital heritage,
multimedia archive, telepresence, intuitive interfaces,
cultural communication.


netzspannung.org is being developed at MARS-Exploratory
Media Lab of the Fraunhofer Institute for Media
Communication ­ under the direction of Monika Fleischmann
and Wolfgang Strauss. The platform is supported by the
German Federal Ministry for Education and Research.


Contact partner:
    Gabriele Blome and Jochen Denzinger
    redaktion {AT} netzspannung.org

http://netzspannung.org/cultural-heritage/en
http://netzspannung.org/en
http://www.imk.fraunhofer.de/mars/


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 11 Apr 2003 13:28:37 +1000
From: Ned Rossiter <Ned.Rossiter {AT} arts.monash.edu.au>
Subject: cfp: CULTURAL ATTITUDES TOWARDS TECHNOLOGY AND  COMMUNICATION


Date: Mon, 07 Apr 2003 16:02:16 +0800
From: Fay Sudweeks <sudweeks {AT} murdoch.edu.au>
Subject: [Catac] CATaC04 in Karlstad, Sweden
Sender: catac-admin {AT} philo.at
To: catac-l <catac {AT} hhobel.phl.univie.ac.at>

CALL FOR PAPERS

Fourth International Conference on
CULTURAL ATTITUDES TOWARDS TECHNOLOGY AND COMMUNICATION
(CATaC'04)
27 June-1 July 2004
Karlstad University, Sweden
http://www.it.murdoch.edu.au/catac/

Conference theme:
Off the shelf or from the ground up?
ICTs and cultural marginalization, homogenization or hybridization

The biennial CATaC conference series provides a continuously expanding
international forum for the presentation and discussion of current research
on how diverse cultural attitudes shape the implementation and use of
information and communication technologies (ICTs). The conference series
brings together scholars from around the globe who provide diverse
perspectives, both in terms of the specific culture(s) they highlight in
their presentations and discussions, and in terms of the discipline(s)
through which they approach the conference theme. The first conference in
the series was held in London in 1998, the second in Perth in 2000, and the
third in Montreal in 2002.

Beginning with our first conference in 1998, the CATaC conferences have
highlighted theoretical and praxis-oriented scholarship and research from
all parts of the globe, including Asia, Africa, and the Middle-East. The
conferences focus especially on people and communities at the developing
edges of ICT diffusion, including indigenous peoples and those outside the
English-speaking world.

Understanding the role of culture in how far minority and/or indigenous
cultural groups may succeed - or fail - in taking up ICTs designed for a
majority culture is obviously crucial to the moral and political imperative
of designing ICTs in ways that will not simply reinforce such groups'
marginalization. What is the role of culture in the development of ICTs
"from the ground up" - beginning with the local culture and conditions -
rather than assuming dominant "off the shelf" technologies are appropriate?
Are the empowering potentials of ICTs successfully exploited among minority
and indigenous groups, and/or do they rather engender cultural
marginalization, cultural homogenization or cultural hybridization?

Original full papers (especially those which connect theoretical frameworks
with specific examples of cultural values, practices, etc.) and short papers
(e.g. describing current research projects and preliminary results) are
invited.

Topics of particular interest include but are not limited to:

- - Culture: theory and praxis
- - Culture and economy
- - Alternative models for ICT diffusion
- - Role of governments and activists in culture, technology and communication
- - ICTs and cultural hybridity
- - ICTs and intercultural communication
- - Culture, communication and e-learning


SUBMISSIONS

All submissions will be peer reviewed by an international panel of
scholars and researchers and accepted papers will appear in the conference
proceedings. You may purchase the conference proceedings from the 2000 and
2002 conferences from http://www.it.murdoch.edu.au/catac.

There will be the opportunity for selected papers from this 2004 conference
to appear in special issues of journals and a book. Papers in previous
conferences have appeared in journals (Journal of Computer Mediated
Communication, Electronic Journal of Communication/La Revue Electronique de
Communication, AI and Society, Javnost- The Public, and New Media and
Society) and a book (Culture, Technology, Communication: towards an
Intercultural Global Village, 2001, edited by Charles Ess with Fay Sudweeks,
SUNY Press, New York).

Initial submissions are to be emailed to catac {AT} it.murdoch.edu.au as an
attachment (Word, HTML, PDF). Submission of a paper implies that it
has not been submitted or published elsewhere. At least one author of
each accepted paper is expected to present the paper at the
conference.

IMPORTANT DATES

Full papers (10-20 pages): 12 January 2004
Short papers (3-5 pages): 26 January 2004
Notification of acceptance: end February 2004
Final formatted papers: 29 March 2004


CONFERENCE CO-CHAIRS
  Charles Ess, Drury University, USA, cmess {AT} drury.edu
  Fay Sudweeks, Murdoch University, Australia, catac {AT} it.murdoch.edu.au
CONFERENCE VICE-CHAIR
  Malin Sveningsson, Karlstad University, Sweden, malin.sveningsson {AT} kau.se




_______________________________________________
Catac mailing list
Catac {AT} philo.at
http://philo.at/mailman/listinfo/catac
_______________________________________________


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 11 Apr 2003 13:28:37 +1000
From: Ned Rossiter <Ned.Rossiter {AT} arts.monash.edu.au>
Subject: cfp: E-Governance: Regions, Devolution, Participation, Formation

MONASH UNIVERSITY

Institute of Regional Studies Annual International Conference
13-14 November , 2003
Call for Papers

E-Governance :
Regions, Devolution, Participation, Formation

The effects on regional populations of ICT-assisted forms of 
governance is the theme of the 2nd Annual IRS conference. Papers are 
invited which explore issues raised by decentralisation and 
devolution, the remaking of regions online, and the means used by 
governments to connect and affiliate citizens to regional community, 
place, or nation.

Globalising information and communication technologies help to speed 
up the pressures  exerted by cities, nations and regions wanting 
greater autonomy and a change in the relations they share with 
centralised governments.  Far-reaching devolution of powers has 
resulted in the UK and EU.  Regional or rural populations may now see 
more in common with counterparts in other regions or countries than 
they do with their own metropolitan neighbours.

At the same time, central governments are rapidly building regional 
ICT infrastructure, access and skills. Citizens are being asked to 
become more involved in their own governance through online means. 
Policy speaks of the need to invigorate civic and community 
participation in democratic practices beyond the ballot, to develop 
human and social capital in innovative, democratic and sustainable 
ways, and to build affiliation and commitment to a local community. 
Papers exploring the connections between the new online and offline 
organisations of political and social space, and addressing whether 
the internet helps to engender a new sense of place and community are 
particularly welcomed.

Abstracts of not more than 400 words are invited from academic 
researchers, consultants, public and private sector workers, 
practitioners and policy makers. Case studies and/or theory papers 
may address any of the broad themes below.

(	What is driving devolution and what enables governance when it occurs?

(	What is the connection between devolution and the new impetus 
to consult?

* In what ways is the idea of region being re-made online? How does 
online activity differ from more traditional means of participation?

* Are citizens, in "regional spaces," using technology to remake 
affinity to place ,
and retain or regain regional power? How are different groups 
participating in on-line policy making for example?

(	What kinds of regional online activities count as 
e-government best-practice?

* Are citizen-government interactions being democratised by the 
internet - or are
new ICT-savvy elites forming?

(  Timelines (

Abstracts Due: June 7th
Results of Review by Conference Committee: July 15th
Full Papers Due: September 30thth
Results of Review for Refereed Stream and Possible Publication: October 20th

An edited book of selected conference papers is planned for 
publication. All papers for the conference will be peer reviewed and 
those accepted for the refereed stream will thus meet Australian DEST 
requirements.

( Full and Reduced-Cost Registrations (

Full registration is $250.00 including all meals and conference 
notes.  Please note that the registration fee does not include 
accommodation costs.

A limited number of places at the conference will be at a reduced 
cost.  Postgraduate students, staff at Gippsland Campus, and members 
of community organisations are invited to apply. Please contact the 
IRS Conference Organiser.

( Venue (

The conference will be hosted by the University's Institute of 
Regional Studies at Monash's only regional campus in the central 
Gippsland town of Churchill, located about 160 km southeast of 
Melbourne. The campus lies in the foothills of the picturesque 
Strzelecki Ranges, in a region of great natural beauty, close to surf 
beaches, forest and parks. See www.gippsland.monash.edu.au

( Enquiries (

Convener: Dr. Mary Griffiths
mary.griffiths {AT} arts.monash.edu.au

IRS Conference Organiser: Dr. Mardelene Grobbelaar
Mardelene.Grobbelaar {AT} buseco.monash.edu.au


IRS Director: Associate Prof. Al Rainnie
Al.Rainnie {AT} buseco.monash.edu.au


------------------------------

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