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<nettime> gangsters digested spectacle {x2}
nettime's organised criminal syndicate on Thu, 17 Jan 2002 07:47:39 +0100 (CET)


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<nettime> gangsters digested spectacle {x2}


From: andrew garton <agarton {AT} toysatellite.org>
Organization: http://www.toysatellite.org
Message-ID: <13032123471.20020117124536 {AT} toysatellite.org>
To: David A Cox <dcox {AT} netspace.net.au>
Subject: Re: Korea etc

hi David,

Wednesday, January 16, 2002, 10:21:49 AM, you wrote:


DAC> I read in this weeks TIME magazine ( not exactly a beacon of balanced
DAC> reporting, mind) that the Korean organised crime gangs are moving in on
DAC> the political process. Could be something to do with that. Gangsters are
DAC> not noted for their tolerance of sexual diversity.

Contrary to this, so called "gangsters" in Taiwan are generally behind
most  dance  clubs  and  outdoor  events, ensuring not only safety for
people  of  mixed  persuasions  (generally from the Police), that they
have  a  major,  if  not  monopoly  on  the  sale  of dance/rave/party
enhancements.

-ag.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

From: David A Cox <dcox {AT} netspace.net.au>
To: andrew garton <agarton {AT} toysatellite.org>
Subject: Re: Korea etc

> 
> DAC> I read in this weeks TIME magazine ( not exactly a beacon of balanced
> DAC> reporting, mind) that the Korean organised crime gangs are moving in on
> DAC> the political process. Could be something to do with that. Gangsters are
> DAC> not noted for their tolerance of sexual diversity.
> 
> Contrary to this, so called "gangsters" in Taiwan are generally behind
> most  dance  clubs  and  outdoor  events, ensuring not only safety for
> people  of  mixed  persuasions  (generally from the Police), that they
> have  a  major,  if  not  monopoly  on  the  sale  of dance/rave/party
> enhancements.

Thus the raver in Korea has his or her experiences mediated by an external
power it hardly matters whose power, its someone elses power.

"The alienation of the spectator to the profit of the contemplated object
(which is the result of his own unconscious activity) is expressed in the
following way: the more he contemplates the less he lives; the more he
accepts recognizing himself in the dominant images of need, the less he
understands his own existence and his own desires. The externality of the
spectacle in relation to the active man appears in the fact that his own
gestures are no longer his but those of another who represents them to
him. This is why the spectator feels at home nowhere, because the
spectacle is everywhere. "

				The Society of the Spectacle
				Chapter 1 "Separation Perfected"
				Guy Debord, Society of the Spectacle

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